28
Feb 18

Forgotten Chicago’s Survey of Ukrainian Village Stained Glass

stained glass entrance in ukrainian village

stained glass entrance in Ukrainian village (photo courtesy of ForgottenChicago.com)

Are you familiar with Forgotten Chicago? Their website helps serve their mission “to discover and document little-known elements of Chicago’s infrastructure, architecture, neighborhoods and general cityscape, whether existing or historical. ” They provide a lot of historical information and documentation on the site, as well as offer periodic historical walking tours, keep an active Twitter feed going with updates on historical Chicago buildings and/or neighborhoods.

The picture above is from a short post that used to reside on their website about the stained glass windows in our neighborhood. It’s no longer up on their site but there are additional photos of Ukrainian Village entrances with stained glass and without in one of their articles about the old house-numbering system in Chicago that you can still see in our neighborhood. Do you have a stained glass entrance in your Ukrainian Village house or an old house number? Learn more on the Forgotten Chicago.website or their social media feeds.

 


05
Aug 12

Nice Write-up of our June Church Walk by a Local Carpatho-Rusyn Society Group

Interior of Saints Volodymyr & Olha Ukrainian Catholic Church (photo via Lake MIchigan Rusyns)

A group from the Lake Michigan Chapter of the Carpatho-Rusyn Society stopped by Ukrainian Village in June for our Church Walk and recently published a post on their blog about the tour with some photos of the church interiors as well as some historical background.

On warm, sunny Saturday, June 16, the Lake Michigan Chapter participated in a walking tour of five churches in the Ukrainian Village section of Chicago.  Located in a patchwork of neighborhoods known as West Town, Ukrainian Village is a small but vibrant ethnic section that still honors its roots while welcoming newcomers.  Built in the late-1800s and early-1900s, many of the brick houses and two-flats along the tree-lined streets have been designated historic landmarks. Named for the Eastern European immigrants who bought homes there in the 1920s, the village still reflects a strong Ukrainian presence despite the influx of new businesses, urban professionals, artists and families.

We’re glad to hear about such great reviews of our first ever church walk and we hope to host another one next year.